Discount Allowed and Discount Received

What is Discount Allowed and Discount Received?

Discount allowed is a reduction in price of goods or services allowed by a seller to a buyer and is an expense for the seller. However, Discount received is the concession in price received by the buyer of the goods and services from the seller and is an income for the buyer.

Discount Allowed and Discount Received

You are free to use this image on your website, templates etc, Please provide us with an attribution linkHow to Provide Attribution?Article Link to be Hyperlinked
For eg:
Source: Discount Allowed and Discount Received (wallstreetmojo.com)

Journal Entries

There are two types of discounts allowed by the seller. First is a Trade discount and another is Cash discount.

Trade discountTrade DiscountThe reduction in list price allowed by a supplier to the consumer while selling the product in bulk quantities is referred to as a trade discount. It is carried out in order to boost the sale of the business.read more is not recorded in the books of accounts. It is generally given at the time of sales, like on bulk purchase. Hence, the Sales amount is shown net of trade discount in the books.

A cash discountCash DiscountCash discounts are direct incentives and discounts provided by any company to their customers in exchange for paying their bills on time or before the due date. This is a common practice, and the discount may differ from one company to the next depending on the terms and conditions.read more is given as an incentive for early payment. It is shown as an expense in the Profit and loss account. Initially, the sales are shown as full amount. Then, the receivables are reduced with the amount of discount allowed.

#1 – Discount Allowed

Discount allowed is accounted as an expense of the seller. Hence, it is debited while making accounting entriesAccounting EntriesAccounting Entry is a summary of all the business transactions in the accounting books, including the debit & credit entry. It has 3 major types, i.e., Transaction Entry, Adjusting Entry, & Closing Entry. read more in the books.

Journal entry performed –

Discount Allowed and Discount Received Journal Entry 1.4
Example

Mr. Paul sells a water cooler at $50,000. Mr. Paul offers a 10% trade discount if the customer purchases 2 water coolers. If the customer makes an upfront cash payment, a further 5% discount is given on total sales value.

Here, the seller offers two types of discounts, a 10% trade discount to increase the sales and a 5% cash discount as an incentive to make a quick payment.

Trade discount is not recorded in the books and sales are shown as net of trade discount offered.

Journal Entry 1.1

#2 – Discount Received

There are two types of discounts received by the buyer. First is a Trade discount and another is Cash discount.

Trade discount is not recorded in the books of accounts. It is generally given at the time of sales, like on bulk purchase. Hence, the Purchase amount is shown net of trade discount in the books.

A cash discount is received as an incentive for early payment. It is shown as an income in the Profit and loss account. Initially, the Purchases are shown as full amount. Then, the payable is reduced with the amount of discount received.

Discount received is accounted as an income in the books of the buyer. Hence, it is credited while making accounting entries in the books.

Journal entry performed –

Discount Allowed and Discount Received Journal Entry 1.2
Example

Mr. Paul sells a water cooler at $50,000. Mr. Paul offers a 10% trade discount if the customer purchases 2 water coolers. If the customer makes an upfront cash payment, a further 5% discount is given on total sales value.

Here, the seller offers two types of discounts, a 10% trade discount to increase the sales and a 5% cash discount as an incentive to make a quick payment.

Here we will make accounting entries in the books of the buyer.

Trade discount is not recorded in the books, and Purchases are shown as net of trade discount received.

Discount Received Example

Discount Allowed in Cash Book

A cash book is a financial statementFinancial StatementFinancial statements are written reports prepared by a company's management to present the company's financial affairs over a given period (quarter, six monthly or yearly). These statements, which include the Balance Sheet, Income Statement, Cash Flows, and Shareholders Equity Statement, must be prepared in accordance with prescribed and standardized accounting standards to ensure uniformity in reporting at all levels.read more to record cash transactions like cash sales, cash purchases, cash payments, etc. There are two sides to the cash book, i.e., the DebitDebitDebit is an entry in the books of accounts, which either increases the assets or decreases the liabilities. According to the double-entry system, the total debits should always be equal to the total credits.read more side and the Credit side. Cash receiptsCash ReceiptsA cash receipt is a small document that works as evidence that the amount of cash received during a transaction involves transferring cash or cash equivalent. The original copy of this receipt is given to the customer, while the seller keeps the other copy for accounting purposes.read more are recorded on the debit side, and cash payments are recorded on the credit side.

The discount allowed by the seller is recorded on the debit side of the cash book.

Here is the format of the cash book –

Discount Allowed in Cash Book

Discount Received in Trial Balance

Trial Balance shows the ledger balances of all the accounts. The debit and credit side of the trial balance should be equal.

The discount received is an income for the buyer. Hence, the balance of the discount received account is shown on the credit side.

Difference Between Discount Allowed and Discount Received

Discount Allowed Discount Received
Discount allowed is granted by the seller to the buyer. The discount received is received by the buyer from the seller.
The discount allowed is the expense of the seller. Discount Received is an income of the buyer.
Discount allowed is debited in the books of the seller. Discount Received is credited in the books of the buyer.

Advantages

  • Increased Sales – Offering discounts helps increase sales and attract new customers. As paying lesser money is an incentive for the buyer.
  • Saves Money – Discounts save money for the buyer since he has to pay lesser for the same amount of goods.
  • Early & Quick Payments – Offering cash discounts helps get early payments.
  • Customer Loyalty – Customer will always like to buy goods from where he can get the best deal and concession.

Conclusion

Discount received, and discount allowed both are different sides of the same coin. In any transaction involving a discount, one party allows a discount, and another is receiving the discount. For the buyer, the discount received is an income of the buyer, and the discount allowed is the seller’s expense.

Recommended Articles

This has been a guide to what is Discount Allowed and Discount Received. Here we discuss journal entries of discount allowed and discount received along with its examples, advantages, and differences. You may learn more about financing from the following articles –