FOB Destination (Free on Board)

Meaning of FOB Destination

FOB Destination i.e. Free on Board Destination is the term which implies that the ownership or title of the goods supplied by the supplier from foreign country is transferred to the purchaser of the goods only when the goods arrive at the purchaser’s loading dock or more specifically when the goods reach to the specified location of buyer and that’s why seller bears all the losses that occur during the transit..

Free on Board is one of the commonly used shipping terms, which means that the legal title to the goods remains with the Supplier until the goods reach the buyer location.

  • The Free onboard destination is the location where the ownership changes hand from the seller to the buyer, and thus, the actual sale of goods occurs. It is vital for the accounts, as it dictates the period when the amounts need to enter in the records.
  • It outlines the key terms indicating whether the seller or buyer will incur the expense to get the goods to the destination.
  • The title of the goods usually passes from the supplier to the buyer. It means that goods are reported as inventory by the seller when they are in transit since, technically, the sale does not occur until the goods reach the destination.
  • FOB shipping point is the alternative terms for recording the sale in the records. It indicates that the sale is recorded when the seller ships the goods.

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FOB Destination Point Accounting

FOB Destination Shipping

The FOB Destination shipping term also applies to the cost of shipping and the responsibility for the goods, which means that the supplier is the responsible party for the goods and must undertake the delivery fee and the cost of any damages.

There are mainly four variations as below:

FOB Destination-Shipping

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  1. Free on Board destination, freight prepaid and allowed: In this case, seller bears and pays the freight charges and is the owner of the goods while they are in transit. Transfer of title takes place only when the goods reach the buyer’s location.
  2. Free on Board destination, freight prepaid and added: In this case, freight charges are payable by the seller, but the billing is to the customer. The seller owns the goods in the case also while they are in transit. Transfer of title takes place only when the goods reach the buyer’s location.
  3. Free on Board destination, freight collects: In this case, the buyer pays the freight charges at the time of receipt, but the supplier still is the one who owns the goods while they are in transit.
  4. Free on Board destination, freight collects and allowed: In this case, the buyer pays for the freight costs but deducts the same from the final supplier’s invoice. The seller still owns the goods while they are in transit.

Any type of FOB destination shipping terms will supersede if a buyer elects to override those terms with the customer-arranged pickup, where a buyer arranges to have goods picked up at its own risk from the seller’s location, and takes responsibility for the goods from that point. In this situation, the billing staff is required to be aware of the new delivery terms so that it does not bill freight charges to the buyer.

If the goods are damaged during transit, the seller should file an insurance claim with the insurance carrier. The seller possesses the title to the goods during the period when the goods were damaged.

In most cases, without a free onboard destination agreement, the shipper/seller will probably record a sale as soon as goods leave its shipping dock, irrespective of the terms of delivery. Thus, the real impact of FOB destination shipping terms is the determination of who bears the risk during transit and pays for the freight expense.

Examples

Example #1

Bloemen Alle is a Russian businessman engaged in the export of carpets. It received an order worth $5,000 from a Dubai based customer on 10 October 2013, and the supplier was asked to ship the carpets by 25 October 2012 under the FOB agreement. Bloemen Alle shipped the flowers on 21 October 2012. The shipment cost is $400.

When should Bloemen Alle record the sale? When should the Dubai based customer record the sale, and at what cost?

Since the shipment is the FOB shipping point, the delivery is made at the moment the carpets are shipped. Bloemen Alle should record the sale of $5,000 on 21 October 2012.

The Dubai based customer should record the purchase on 21 October 2012 too. It should record the inventory of $5,400 ($5,000 purchase price plus $400 shipment cost). It is because, under the FOB shipping point, the shipment cost is usually incurred by the buyer.

Example #2

XYZ’s corporation orders 100 computers from Dell to replace its current point of sale systems. XYZ orders them with FOB destination shipping terms. After receiving the order, Dell packages up the computers and sends the packed computers to the delivery department where they are loaded onto the ship. Halfway to its destination, the ship crashes, and the computers got destroyed. Who is responsible?

Since the computers were shipped FOB destination, Dell (the seller) is responsible for the damage during the shipping process. The goods were never delivered to XYZ, so Dell, in this case, is fully liable for the computer damages and would have to file a claim with its insurance company.

FOB Destination (Free on Board) Video

This article has been a guide to what is FOB Destination. Here we discuss Free on Board Destination Accounting, FOB Destination Shipping types along with practical examples. You may also learn more about accounting from the following articles –

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