Pareto Analysis

What is Pareto Analysis?

Pareto Analysis is a decision making technique based on the 80/20 rule where 80% of the benefits of the project can be achieved by the company by doing the 20% of the work or the 80% problem of the company is traced to 20 % causes. This decision-making technique separates the limited number of the input factors statistically which have the greatest impact on the outcome whether desirable or undesirable. It is found that this analysis is applicable in various fields, from economics to quality control.

Pareto Analysis Steps

The steps involved in the analysis include the following:

  1. Identification and Listing of Problems

    The first step is to list down all the problems which are required to get resolved by taking the inputs from various means such as clients, team members, surveys, etc.

  2. Root Cause Identification

    After identifying the problem, their root cause should be identified using the different techniques.

  3. Score Problems

    Scoring of the problem should be done by assigning the numbers to each of the problems depending on the problem that one is trying to solve.

  4. Grouping Problems

    After scoring the problem, problems should be grouped on the basis of the root cause.

  5. Adding Up Each Group Score

    Scores of each cause group will then be added as a group with the highest score with being given the highest priority, and the lowest score will be given the lowest priority.

  6. Taking Necessary Action

    Lastly, develop and implement an action plan for the purpose of solving problems with the focus on the greatest scored problems first.

Pareto-Analysis

You are free to use this image on your website, templates etc, Please provide us with an attribution linkHow to Provide Attribution?Article Link to be Hyperlinked
For eg:
Source: Pareto Analysis (wallstreetmojo.com)

Example of Pareto Analysis

Mr. X is the owner of the service centre, which is not working well as expected. Mr. X is worried about the same and wants to resolve the problems and increase the overall satisfaction of the customer. He decided to go for the Pareto analysis.

Step 1: Identification and Listing of Problems

Mr. X lists the problems with the help of the number of complaints received by the service centre.

  • Phone calls are not picked up quickly.
  • Staff at the service centre doesn’t have enough knowledge to resolve customer complaints.
  • No fixed time for the engineering staff to come to the centre. For that reason, a customer may have to wait for a longer time.
  • All the parts of the gadgets are not available, so; a customer may need to visit the second time after placing the order.
  • Staff is too few due to which they are under pressure.
  • The problem could be solved over the phone for which the customers are asked to a visitor to the centre.

Step 2: Root Cause Identification

After identifying the problem, their root cause is identified, as shown in the table.

Step 3: Score Problems

To score the problem, the number of complaints is taken as the base as received by the service centre. Scores are shown in the below table.

Pareto Analysis Example 1

Step 4: Grouping Problems

After scoring the problem, problems should be grouped together on the basis of the root cause. In the present case, three root causes are there, which include too few staff at the centre, lack of training, and poor organization.

Step 5: Adding up Each Group Score

Scores of each cause group will then be added as a group with the highest score with being given the highest priority, and the lowest score will be given the lowest priority.

Pareto Analysis Example 1.1

Lack of training problems with the highest score with being given the highest priority.

Step 6: Taking Necessary Action

Lastly, develop and implement an action plan for the purpose of solving problems with the focus on the greatest scored problems first. So, Mr. X should focus more on giving training to the staff as, by this, he will get the biggest benefit. After this is done, he should look at the increasing number of staff.

Advantages & Disadvantages of Pareto Analysis

Advantages

  • Pareto analysis is one of the powerful tools for solving the problems which is simple and effective. Even though the technique is based on finding mostly 20 % of the fundamental causes which are responsible for the 80 % problems, it still can be used for the solutions where the rule of 80:20 does not apply.
  • The problem-solving skills of the person conducting this analysis can be increased because it enables the person to organize problems related to the work into the cohesive facts, and once these facts are outlined clearly, planning can be started to solve problems.
  • The procedures and the processes which are followed while making changes are generally documented while conducting this analysis, which will help in better preparation and improvements in future decision making.

Disadvantages

  • Pareto analysis conducted does not provide the solutions to issues; rather only helps in identifying a few significant causes that are responsible for the majority of problems.
  • This analysis is based on past information that small business owners may not find useful because that might not represent the current situation of the company correctly.
  • Its success is dependent on the accuracy of scoring each of the issues. Businesses that fail to assign proper scoring against each factor on the Pareto chart will get inaccurate results.

Important Points of Pareto Analysis

  • The idea of the 80:20 rule states that 80 % of the benefit of the project can be achieved by the company by doing 20% of the work, or the 80% problem of the company is traced to 20 % causes.
  • Each problem is given a numerical score on the basis of the level of impact.

Conclusion

Pareto Analysis is the technique for the prioritization of the work of problem-solving so that a number of problems could be solved. It is based on the Pareto principle, which is also known as the 80/20 rule where the idea of 80/20 rule states that 80 % of the benefit of the project can be achieved by the company by doing the 20% of the work or the 80% problem of the company is traced to 20 % causes. It does not only show the most important problem but at the same time, it also gives a score showing the severity of the problem.

Recommended Articles

This has been a guide to what is Pareto Analysis and its definition. Here we discuss the example of Pareto analysis along with advantages and disadvantages. You can learn more about accounting from the following articles –

Reader Interactions

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *